Categories
Article

These 10 Idaho Laws Will Leave You Scratching Your Head

These 10 Idaho Laws Will Leave You Scratching Your Head

These statutes are perfectly reasonable . . . right?

Every state has them. We all have a good chuckle at them. But we also hope that law enforcement doesn’t take some of them too seriously. Here are Idaho’s top ten weird laws.

10. Musicians Cannot Loiter After Gigs

It may seem a little odd at first glance, but this law actually has some method to its madness. This is intended to keep musicians who are under the legal drinking age of 21 years old from kicking it at the bar for a sip of the Devil’s nectar after their set.

9. You May Not Share Your Dog’s Kennel With Them

In Wallace, Idaho, dogs have rights. One of them sounds an awful lot like the right to private property. Your dog may not be forced to share its accommodations with anyone or anything else. So, no, you can’t take a nap with your dog in their kennel, even if you wanted to.

8. Merry-Go-Round Rides Forbidden On Sundays

The Sunday Rest Law has been repealed, but when it was on the books, it killed all fun there was to be had on Sundays.

7. PDA May Only Last 18 Minutes Or Less

Another fabled law that has since been repealed stated that public decency was to be maintained by limiting the amount of kissing couples did in the open. In the modern day, there are some laws we should all be grateful for which are closely related to it. 

6. No Selling Chickens After Sundown Without Permission From the Sheriff

While information out there is sparse, it’s hard to imagine this law not coming from the days of the wild west. Too many ruffians must’ve been selling stolen chickens after nightfall in old rural Idaho, or something similar. No matter what the original story, laws surrounding the keeping and selling of livestock are taken very seriously in Idaho.

5. No Fishing From The Backs Of Moose

Actually, according to Idaho Fish & Game, a little over 100 years ago, laws were put in place to make it illegal to fish from the back of any animal.

4. No Hunting From Helicopters

While it is definitely illegal to hunt any animal by shooting it from a moving helicopter, tank, or jet pack, it’s also illegal to hunt from any motorized or airborne vehicle whatsoever. It is also illegal to use a motor vehicle to stir up animals into revealing their positions, or to use remote vehicles (i.e., drones) to locate prey.

3. Cannibalism Is Mostly Illegal

Idaho has the Donner Party of 1846 to thank for this one. This desperate group of pioneers from Illinois was stranded in the mountains during a blizzard once they got to California. The horror stories go that some members of the party were forced to take drastic measures to survive. Idaho lawmakers from way back in the day made it known to their constituents they shouldn’t eat someone unless they really needed to.

2. FACECRIME

George Orwell predicted authoritarian regimes would be watching over its citizens to control even the minutest actions of every person its grip, right down to facial expressions and inner thoughts and beliefs. What he didn’t know was that one of the first iterations of it would be codified into law in Pocatello, Idaho’s, Smile Ordinance.

1. The World’s Strictest Potato Standards

It makes perfect sense that Idado would not want to sully its reputation by selling, packaging, and shipping potatoes that are too small, too soft and moldy, or hadn’t been cleaned to look fresh and immaculate. “Idaho Deluxe” potatoes fall under very strict guidelines which have been made law by the State of Idaho. This was done to make sure Idaho maintained the highest standards for the vegetable anywhere.

The next time you Go! about your day, beware of breaking these top ten strange Idaho laws.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Adam Brimhall

Adam Brimhall

An expert at going out.

Categories
Article

Idaho Day 2020

Idaho Day 2020

Go! Create some fun new Idaho Day traditions after a ceremony at the Statehouse 12:00 pm March 4th.

March 4th, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln removed a large chunk of Washington Territory with the stroke of a pen. Idaho Territory was born when he signed the Organic Act, and he helped set up its original government by assigning hand-picked staffers and officers to its highest positions. Pres. Lincoln’s influence over the Homestead Act and the Pacific Railway Act also proved essential in bringing settlers to Idaho, leading to a population large enough to vote and become a State in the larger Union.

During that chaotic time in history, when states could change their names and sizes seemingly at a whim, Idaho struggled to establish and maintain its borders and identity. Those struggles are heavily shrouded in myth, particularly the story behind the boundary between Idaho and Montana. Some stories say Montana unscrupulously took a large portion of Idaho’s land away on its eastern side.

Before 1863, what is now Idaho was ruled over by Washington Territory from its capital in Olympia. Gold was discovered near Lewiston in 1860, which inspired an influx of miners and prospectors to the area. With sudden immigration from many other states, changes in both population and politics played on the fears of those calling the shots in Olympia. Feeling anxious there would be a vote to move the capital away from Olympia to a city further east in Idaho, Washington Territory legislative officials chose not to put up a fight when Lewiston and other patches of mining terrain voted to withdraw and become part of the newly created state of Idaho.

There are many other border stories about Idaho: how it was carved out of the Deseret Territory created by the Mormons, how it used to extend as far east as the Dakotas, but those tales aren’t as interesting as something that has come up more recently. 

Mike McCarter is the chief petitioner of a movement behind the attempt to create a new state called Greater Idaho. He and a group of other like-minded citizens in the Pacific Northwest are hoping to redraw boundaries so that most of Oregon and a large piece of northern California would become part of Idaho. If you like this idea, you can sign their petition and help get this massive state line redraw rolling.

In honor of President Lincoln taking that initial step towards the creation of our home state, we celebrate Idaho Day every March 4th. This year, Go! to the Statehouse at 12:00 pm to meet with Idaho officials, including Gov. Brad Little and First Lady Teresa Little, and Idaho Superintendent of Public Instruction Sherri Ybarra, as they celebrate Idaho Day with a spotlight on inspiring Idaho women. Permeal French, Idaho’s first female Superintendent of Public Instruction, will be a special focus of Idaho Day 2020. 

Idaho Day is a chance for us to be model citizens and honor our history, but it is also a day to have some Idaho state pride. Best of all, it gives us all an excuse to celebrate and maybe start some fun new traditions. 

What do you think would be a good Idaho Day tradition? A beer festival like the Germans have in early fall? A series of athletic competitions? Another tailgate party at Alberston’s Stadium, even if the football season is over? Let us know what fun Idaho Day tradition you think we should start and hope to make last for future generations.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Adam Brimhall

Adam Brimhall

An expert at going out.

Categories
Article

BUSTED! Top Idaho Officials Caught Distilling Whiskey During the Prohibition Era

BUSTED! Top Idaho Officials Caught Distilling Whiskey During the Prohibition Era

Idaho may not have had an Al Capone, but these prominent citizens caused a stir when they were caught moonshining.

Like the other states, Idaho played its part in shaping our nation’s values during the turbulent times of the Prohibition Era. Being more culturally conservative than many other states, it saw groups like the Women’s Christian Temperance Union and the Anti-Saloon League sweep through and settle in and become citizens of Idaho. These groups mostly favored Boise and Lewiston. They were partially responsible for lighting the fires of moral panic which eventually grew to such a conflagration that an additional amendment to the constitution and a new federal force were created to address it.

One of the longest-lasting Idaho laws still on the books today was introduced by these special interest groups. It’s called the Sabbath Law and is what remains of anti-liquor statutes since the dust of the prohibition battle has settled. It is this law that keeps liquor stores closed on Sundays and certain holidays. 

In 1915, Moses Alexander, the first practicing Jewish state governor in the United States, won an election running on a platform that took temperance all the way to prohibition. Two years later, intoxicating beverages were forbidden in Idaho.

Seven years after that, boom, busted! Boise Chief of Police Henry R. Griffith, Ada County Sheriff James D. Agnew Jr., Dr. Henry Goodfriend (a physician who was an influential and noteworthy citizen of Boise at the time), Boise city police detective Ed Hill, and a handful of less prominent community members, were all arrested and tried for manufacturing and selling a “certain intoxicating liquor commonly known as ‘moonshine whisky.’” The trial lasted six months and only Police Chief Griffith got away without a conviction.

You can see Chief Griffith and Detective Ed Hill in this photo of the 1922 Boise Police Department courtesy of Boise State University.

Records from almost a hundred years ago (or more) being what they are, it is difficult to know if this level of government corruption was, until then, unprecedented in Idaho. Not only is this case remarkable for involving government officials, but it is one of the first cases in Idaho to consider and debate the ethics of being surveilled or recorded without permission, and having that record used against an opponent in court.

Finally, in 1933, Amendment 21 was passed to repeal Amendment 18, and Americans everywhere cracked open a cold one in celebration. 

Every state handled the cleanup from the wreckage of prohibition differently. In Idaho, further laws were made in 1935 in which the government saw fit to retain control over liquor sales and distribution. Beer and wine, however, are managed almost entirely through the private market.

What complicates matters is that each county in Idaho can add or change its own statutes to already existing state law for a better cultural fit for the communities in those areas. For example, liquor served by the drink is entirely illegal in Rexburg, Idaho.

While there is a consistent, overarching system of state laws regarding alcohol sale and consumption in Idaho, there are little pockets of very particular rules. These are the legacy of the roaring 20s prohibition laws. Idaho was left with somewhat of a patchwork of city and county laws, and has been stained with a streak of corruption in its governmental history. Embarrassing, sure, but not unusual for the circumstances of the day. Most cities had a corruption problem during those strange times.

Now, in the 21st century, America has been fighting another prohibition battle with passion and devotion felt on both sides. Cannabis has been illegal in the U.S. for more than a hundred years. But that has been changing rapidly, with each state passing its own legalization laws starting with Colorado and Washington in 2012. Rather than falling in line with the rest of the union, Idaho finds itself an island of prohibition surrounded by states that have voted to decriminalize and legalize marijuana and other THC products. To be fair, the federal government also has yet to get on board with repealing this ban. It hasn’t put forth the sweeping action that Amendment 21 provided, but there are still some rumors out there that things might change.

The prohibition of alcohol in the 1920s and the contemporary ban on cannabis are not the same, but they certainly have their parallels. It was probably not easy for Chief Griffith and the others to deal with falling from such heights during such a complex portion of U.S. and Idaho history. Imagine the people in those same roles today being caught with a giant cannabis growing operation out in the foothills somewhere. 

Our laws and culture are a little different now than it was 97 years ago. Prohibition of the 21st century already looks very different from 20th-century prohibition. But the story isn’t over yet. It remains to be seen how long Idaho can remain alone in a somewhat different legality war.

Follow Idaho State Archives

Follow Idaho Freedom Foundation

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Adam Brimhall

Adam Brimhall

An expert at going out.

Categories
Article

These Explorers Helped Make Idaho What It Is Today

These Explorers Helped Make Idaho What It Is Today

Part history, part folklore, all rugged northwestern heroes

The history of the American West is an incredible and complicated story of brave people, lurking dangers, and the vast unknown, unexplored wilderness of this enormous continent. Shaping this nation required some pretty extraordinary people to step forward and make history. Here are a few frontiersmen  and explorers of the American west that helped make Idaho and the country what it is today.

Lewis, Clark, & Sacagawea

These legendary explorers are well known to most Americans today and their expedition is a standard subject in most elementary schools throughout the western and midwestern states. 

History tells us that, at the behest of President Thomas Jefferson, Captain Meriwether Lewis and his devoted friend Second Lieutenant William Clark set out to explore, survey, and map the recently made Louisana Purchase. In doing so, Americans from back east could get a foothold in the west before the French, British, or other Europeans could make their way through. They also hoped to make this journey profitable on an economic and scientific level by accounting for the region’s flora and fauna and establishing trading posts with Native American tribes. 

Along their travels, they met a 16-year-old woman who was a member of the Shoshone tribe. Her name has many forms, but one of the more popular ones is Sacagawea. She was born near Salmon, Idaho, and, because she spoke Shoshone, she found favor with Lewis and Clark’s company.

Not only was her guidance and interpreting skills necessary to make the journey a success, but she was responsible for saving the written journals and records of Lewis and Clark after their small boat had capsized while floating the Missouri River. Without Sacagawea, much of the historical record we have about their epic mission would have been drowned forever.

Sacagawea’s presence alongside American explorers has reverberated throughout the generations as an instance of good relations between Native American and Anglo American cultures.

Idaho is only one of 11 states through which Lewis and Clark passed, setting up a foundation upon which the history of the western states could begin. These explorers were pivotal in making Idaho what it is today. Many schools, streets, towns, and businesses are their namesakes. Many statues of them can be found all over the country, including one in downtown Boise’s Cecil D. Andrus Park which is across the street from the Idaho State Capital Building. This statue does not depict Sacagawea, but commemorates the assistance the Expedition received from the nearby Nez Perce tribe.

Andrew Henry

Major Andrew Henry was not just a mountain man, but a businessman as well. He and gunpowder fortune beneficiary named William Ashley formed the Rocky Mountain Fur Co. to compete with the fabled Hudson Bay Co. who had merged with another fur trapping giant, The Northwest Fur Co. They, with the help of 100 young adventurers, became mountain men of renown as legends of their adventures trapping and hunting in the wilderness spread.

During their treks, Henry’s company fell afoul of the Blackfoot tribe. In an effort to keep going towards the source of the Columbia River without antagonizing the Blackfoot, they inadvertently discovered Henry’s Fork, a tributary of the Snake River, and, not much further away, Henry’s Lake. Outside what is now St. Anthony, Idaho, the company set up Henry’s Fort for the winter. This was the first time in recorded history that men of European descent had settled in this area.

Jim Bridger

James Felix Bridger, like the majority of the explorers and mountain men of America, served in the U.S. military before taking up trapping and trekking. He was famous for his storytelling talents, as well as his stout hardiness and survival skills throughout his many adventures. During the exploratory age of 19th century America, he became a living legend among his peers, and his name spread throughout the frontier like wildfire. Now historians and history buffs everywhere look on him as the archetypal Mountain Man.

You can see a portrayal of Bridger in the 2015 film The Revenant played by English actor Will Poulter. This film does well in capturing the popularly, if not historically, accepted version of the relationship between Jim Bridger and fellow mountain man Hugh Glass, the victim of the grizzly bear attack seen in the movie. Apparently, Bridger was yet a very young man when the attack occurred, some accounts naming him at 19-years-old, others saying he was but 17. He and another man named Fitzgerald, the story goes, volunteered to stay with Glass until he died of his wounds. Both Fitzgerald and Bridges made the mistake of assuming Glass was actually dead and left him after taking his belongings. 

In the movie, Hugh Glass takes his brutal and righteous vengeance on Fitzgerald while graciously forgiving Bridges for his youthful and inexperienced mistake. There are some accounts that argue Glass merely chastised both men verbally and was adamant to return for his gun and other belongings, not to seek revenge.

Jim Bridges has a wide swath of land in Utah and Idaho named after him. The Cache Valley is known to the locals as Bridgerland. This region encompasses more than 1,100 miles of valley nestled at the edge of the Bear River Mountains. It stretches from Thatcher, Idaho, through Preston, then across the border into Logan and Hyrum, Utah.

Liver-Eating Jonhson

The real Jeremiah Johnson (whose real name is John Garrison) is one of the most famous American mountain men of all time. This is mostly due to some tall tales about him seeking revenge on the Crow tribe for having killed his wife while he was away. Supposedly he did this by killing their warriors and eating their livers.

There are many alternative accounts of Johnson’s life as he roamed northern Wyoming, eastern Idaho, and southern Montana, many which contradict each other. The reason the revenge story gained so much traction was due, in part, to Idaho author Vardis Fisher’s western novel, Mountain Man: A Novel of Male and Female in the Early American West. The novel helped inspire the 1972 hit movie Jeremiah Johnson starring Robert Redford. Since the success and popularity of the film, Fisher’s novel, and other novels like it, the historical figures from the age of explorers and mountain men have enjoyed a renewed and romanticized fame.

Many courageous men and women took part in the complex and fascinating history of America.

You and the family can learn more about some of these great adventurers and others like them who had a hand in creating the Idaho we know today at the Idaho History Museum, the Idaho State Arhchives, the Old Penitentiary, or through the Boise Township Tours. Go! make a day trip out of it and get familiar with Idaho’s roots.

Idaho State Museum

Idaho State Archives

Old Penitentiary

Boise Township Tours

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Adam Brimhall

Adam Brimhall

An expert at going out.

Categories
Article

America’s First Fallout Shelter Now On The Market

America’s First Fallout Shelter Now On The Market

Since the completion of its construction in 1961, this historic Boise building has had a colorful past and is on the market once again

Not too long ago, we talked about the Boise Bomb Shelter and its unique role in the history of the City of Trees. 

It was America’s prototype fallout shelter during the Cold War. If it proved useful, more of them would have been made around the country in an attempt at safeguarding the public. When it was originally planned, it was partially financed by The Federal Civil Defense Administration to the tune of $122,000 in 1960.

But the nuclear war never came, and the “Highland Community Fallout Shelter,” passed into the hands of the Boise School District as office space and a storage facility.

More time passed until 2003 when it was picked up by Jon Farren for $150,000. He fixed it up and rented the rooms out to local musicians as a rehearsal space. A few months back he had made upgrades to some of the rooms, including the bathrooms, and a new sprinkler system to comply with city fire codes.

Jon Farren is now marketing the building on Zillow as a home with two stories, four bedrooms, and three bathrooms, all for the low, low price of $2.1 million. 

What lies ahead for the weird history of Boise’s strangest building? Will it become a home for a well-to-do family as it is advertised? Or will a wealthy eccentric take it in hand and turn it into Boise’s very own Villain’s Lair?

If you have the cash, maybe you ought to Go! make a bid on Boise’s most bizarre structure. You could help keep the history of America’s first fallout shelter weird and unpredictable.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Adam Brimhall

Adam Brimhall

An expert at going out.

Categories
Article

Idaho Has A Seaport

Idaho Has A Seaport

You may not be able to get a beachfront property, but Idaho is more connected to the ocean than it may seem at first glance

Idaho is clearly a landlocked state. According to Google Maps, the distance between the Pacific Ocean and the point of the Idaho border that is the furthest west (about 13 miles west of Weiser, Idaho) is about 338.08 miles. That’s not really a walk-able distance to the beach.

But, thanks to the way the Snake and Columbia Rivers flow, Idaho is connected to the Pacific Ocean through the Port of Portland across more than 450 miles of winding river with dam and lock systems to help ships through. The rivers flow through Washington and Oregon to arrive at the Port of Lewiston in northern Idaho.

The Port describes itself as “a public organization serving the citizens of Nez Perce County as an economic development district, intermodal transportation center and facilitator of international trade.” 

The history of the Port says that everything began in 1931 when the Idaho Senate passed Bill 116. The bill allowed the building of ports in the state. The Port of Lewiston itself was founded in 1958, but it wasn’t until 1975 that the first barge carrying cargo left the docks. Since then, the Port has expanded and improved throughout the decades with major advancements, improvements, and growth every couple of years, until around the year 2000.

By 2010, the Port of Lewiston had shipped 25 million tons of wheat down the river, but the economy had slowed down tremendously, and business at the Port was starting to slow down. Even with the recession of the 2000s and 2010s, the Port of Lewiston continued to operate normally, shipping goods (though at a far lower quantity), providing jobs, and serving as a somewhat stable economic rock for the local populace during uncertain times.

The carrying capacity of the barges and tows the Port of Lewiston uses is staggering. A single barge that travels through the rivers of the Northwest holds the same amount of trade goods as 35 train cars or 134 semi trucks. A tow river boat can carry even more: an entire train and a half, or more than 500 semi trucks worth of goods. The Port has been essential in helping get oversized cargo off of trucks driving the highways and onto ships sailing the waterways to deliver important materials throughout the U.S. and Canada.

The seaport and dam systems in the rivers of Idaho are no small matter for the Northwestern region of the U.S. Nearly 60 percent of the electricity used there is produced by hydroelectric power which makes up 90 percent of the region’s clean, renewable energy. Each year, the Lower Snake River Dam alone provides enough electricity to power a city the size of Seattle. The Port of Lewiston also recognizes the impact of dams on the salmon population of the Columbia and Snake Rivers and has taken steps to assist in the recovery of certain endangered fish species.

It may be small, but Lewiston is one town through which Idaho is connected to the sea and the wider world. The role the Port plays in Idaho’s economy and infrastructure cannot be overlooked. In the words of Senator Mike Crapo via the Port of Lewiston’s website: “The Port’s activities move mountains of grain and freight, driving local commerce. The Port is also responsible for the creation of more than 1800 jobs, enabling the growth of leading companies like Schweitzer Engineering.”

Idaho is full of surprises. It is not everything it seems at first glance. Our state has the most rugged mountains, the wildest forests, the most picturesque lakes, and, despite more than 300 miles between us and the nearest ocean, we have a seaport.

Follow the Port of Lewiston

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Adam Brimhall

Adam Brimhall

An expert at going out.

Categories
Article

This Country-Western Legend Filmed His New Music Video in Boise

This Country-Western Legend Filmed His New Music Video in Boise

After the mega-star recorded his show at Albertson’s Stadium, part of the performance was made into an official video release.

In July of 2019, world-famous country-western singer Garth Brooks, who has been making records and touring since 1989,  finally decided it might be nice to visit the Treasure Valley. Throngs of fans flocked to Ticketmaster, StubHub, and SeatGeek to get tickets and be a part of this once in a lifetime opportunity.

However, in under an hour, all 40,000 seats at Albertson’s Stadium, a venue that had never before seen a major act, were completely sold out. Thousands of other Garth Brooks fans were left in the dust, never knowing if Brooks would ever return.

That’s when Idaho Gov. Brad Little stepped in on behalf of his constituents and personally asked Brooks to stay in town and put on another performance. KTVB’s interview with Gov. Little says he was getting requests from citizens around Boise to ask Brooks to stay, referring to it as a show for “all my friends in low places in Idaho.”

In the end, it worked! Garth Brooks was moved by Gov. Little’s appeal and he booked a second show on July 19th, the day immediately before the initially scheduled performance. Considering the tight scheduling and budgeting of a major touring act like Garth Brooks, this accomplishment is pretty remarkable.

To the surprise of the fans who got in on the show of the 19th, Oklahoma’s very own Blake Shelton took the stage with Brooks to perform “Dive Bar” which was recorded for an official music video that was posted to the official Garth Brooks Facebook page just this morning.

Go! Watch the video and tell us if you or someone you know was there. Let us know if you can see them in Garth Brooks’ and Blake Shelton’s cool new music video filmed right here in Boise.

Follow Garth Brooks

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Adam Brimhall

Adam Brimhall

An expert at going out.

Categories
Article

The City of Pocatello Changed Its Flag — Should Boise Do The Same?

The City of Pocatello Changed Its Flag — Should Boise Do The Same?

Symbols and emblems make a difference, especially on the local level.

It’s been close to three years since the city of Pocatello, Idaho, first flew its newly designed flag. For nearly 20 years, Pocatello flew what was dubbed the worst city flag in North America by the North American Vexillological Association (NAVA).

According to Brian Holmes at KTVB Channel 7 News in Boise, the story goes that, back in the year 2000, the Pocatello Chamber of Commerce designed a logo for a city pride campaign lead by Greg Gunter. Some anonymous person on the campaign team had two flags made.

Then, in May of 2015, TED released a Ted Talks presentation in which design expert Roman Mars explained the differences between good and bad design, particularly when it comes to municipal standards. He notes that most cities, even large and grand ones like San Francisco and Amsterdam, have banners with some pretty ugly, and unwieldy designs.

But the award for the worst design in North America went to Pocatello, Idaho. You can see it at the bottom of this list of bad U.S. city flags.

In the Ted Talk on vexillology, Mars uses Chicago’s sigil as a prime example of good design and tells how a city emblem of that caliber can bring a community together.

It could be said that even a poorly designed flag has the same power. Almost immediately after the citizens of Pocatello heard about NAVA’s rating, the community formed a design committee to change it.

For most residents, this was the first they had heard about having a city emblem at all. Two years later, thanks to the hard work and dedication of many people inside and outside the Pocatello area, a banner displaying a much better design was born. It incorporates imagery that speaks to Pocatello’s environment and history in a way that is simple and noble. It is an image that the people of Pocatello can take pride in calling their own.

Like most of the other 50 states, the Idaho state flag is guilty of going against some of Mars’ design rules through its use of a state seal and an ornate ribbon with Idaho’s name on it. And, like the state, the City of Boise has a flag that would not stand up well against Mars’ design scrutiny. In 2004, NAVA put out an Internet survey for the public to rate the sigils of 150 different American cities. Boise’s banner, which still flies today, was rated 3.05 out of 10, which placed 114th out of 150. 

It’s true, Boise has not been under social fire because of the banner it flies outside City Hall, and there are plenty of other problems to be solved as it is. But maybe we could take a lesson from Pocatello, and heed Roman Mars when he says, “One hundred percent of people care about flags. There’s just something about them that works on our emotions.”

The City of Trees flies a flag that gets the job done. It has gentle colors, a familiar image, and it has the city’s name written across it. But does this flag work on our emotions? Does it light a little fire of Boise pride in our hearts? Is it an easily repeatable and legible symbol that would fit well anywhere? Is it an emblem that could germinate community cohesion and a sense of regional significance?

Boise is growing very quickly. Many people moving here and to Idaho in general plan on settling down and staying for the long haul. The City of Boise could use a symbol that unites us as our communities continue to expand. It may still be a matter of years before Boise reaches the population of a million people; all the more reason for Boise to adopt a symbol the city can be proud of before we get there.

What do you think? Should the City of Boise change its flag? Or is that the last thing it should be worrying about right now?

Follow the City of Boise

Follow the North American Vexillological Association

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Adam Brimhall

Adam Brimhall

An expert at going out.

Categories
Article

Cascade Submits A Bid For A TV Show Renovation

Cascade Submits A Bid For A TV Show Renovation

HGTV’s new show ‘Hometown Takeover’ is how Mayor Judy Nissula hopes to upgrade certain sections of the town.

In 2021, HGTV will release a new show called ‘Hometown Takeover.’ The network has asked for submissions from small towns around America within a particular population limit to apply to be featured on the show. The show would analyze, design, and remodel portions of the town without completely remodeling its identity. Editor for HGTV David L. Haynes says ‘Hometown Takeover’ is all about “helping to create and foster a town persona that draws on its roots, history, and traditions.”

Submissions to be featured on the show are now closed, but Mayor Judy Nissula made sure Cascade, Idaho, was one of what is likely to be hundreds of towns that applied. In an interview with KTVB, Mayor Nissula says she hopes the staff at HGTV selects her application to improve city buildings and public walkways in Cascade. She wants the town to have more incentives for people who grow up there to stay. 

Don’t miss the video the City of Cascade sent HGTV during the application process. Go! here. There is no information as of yet on the selection process for ‘Hometown Takeover,’ or when selected towns will be announced. 

Check back when we follow up and see if Cascade, Idaho, will be on HGTV’s ‘Hometown Takeover.’

Follow City of Cascade

Follow HGTV

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Adam Brimhall

Adam Brimhall

An expert at going out.

Categories
Article

Flying M Coffee Raises Funds For Safety Net AIDS Program

Flying M Coffee Raises Funds For Safety Net AIDS Program

This is the 27th year Flying M has run Valentine’s For AIDS

Flying M Coffee House in downtown Boise is proud to put on the 27th annual Valentine’s For AIDS fundraiser. They showcase the work of local artists and photographers. Flying M patrons can bid on these creative pieces through a silent auction. The full proceeds of the pieces sold go towards the Safety Net AIDS Program which helps provide daily necessary assistance to those living with AIDS.

More than 200 pieces will be on display and waiting to be bid on. Every piece has a home to find. Any one of them is a surefire way to set the tone of any living room, bedroom, office, or den.

In 2019, Valentine’s For AIDS raised $30,000.

Flying M is an iconic Boise cafe. They have worked hard to make Valentine’s For AIDS equally well known in the Boise area. It runs for the week leading up to Valentine’s Day. This year, the final bidding for artwork at Valentine’s For AIDS is February 16th, 2020. There are still a few days left, so GO!, check out the hard work and passion for local Boise artists. You can rest assured your patronage of the local art scene will be going towards a good cause.

Follow Valentine’s For AIDS

Follow Flying M Coffee House

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Adam Brimhall

Adam Brimhall

An expert at going out.